It’s Alee’s Birthday (and Partial Biography)

alee

Alee's Second Birthday Party

Alee (198- ) is an American biologist, researcher, an idealist. She is best known as the blogger behind A Lofty Existence, a blog about relationships, culture, and society.

Alee was born on February 28th in a large city in New England, one of the oldest and most liberal regions of the United States. Because she was a very active baby, physicians attending to her mother before her birth predicted she would be a boy. But Alee was born a girl, and a quiet, lazy one at that.

Alee celebrated her first birthday with her siblings and friends at daycare. She had a huge pink birthday cake, however, Alee didn’t know how to eat cake and got icing all over her expensive birthday dress. But her mother didn’t care — she was just happy that Alee lived to see her first birthday. Alee was a baby who cried so much that her parents thought she would overwork her lungs and die.

Alee went to a Catholic elementary school where she studied a variety of subjects including religion and literature, and played double-dutch during recess. Her teachers loved her and thought she was the perfect pupil. She loved them too, but couldn’t wait to go to a new school after being in one place for six years.

To continue her studies, Alee attended a diverse math and science school. There she made close friends –and enemies– and set records by being the first to do nearly everything. She attended this school for six years as well before moving on to university studies.

For college, Alee attended a private university known for its ivy and sports league. There she studied molecular biology, with several other courses in literature and cultural studies. But more importantly she was exposed to many people from a wealth of backgrounds, cultures, and countries.

Alee has two siblings: an older brother and sister who people say looks just like her, until they see more them twice.

Her hobbies include music, the Internet, molecular biology, and cheesecake.

Advertisements

19 thoughts on “It’s Alee’s Birthday (and Partial Biography)

  1. Happy birthday! Is it your golden? 😉

    I’m loving the blurry picture–you are so creative with your Internet anonymity.

    Alee was a baby who cried so much that her parents thought she would overwork her lungs and die.

    Lol, I would’ve guessed you were a quiet baby. My mom says I never cried as a baby–in fact, I was her easiest child in almost every aspect.

  2. Jasmin, thanks. I’m not quite to my golden yet! 🙂

    “I’m loving the blurry picture–you are so creative with your Internet anonymity.”

    Oh, I don’t care about baby pictures. I tried to make it clearer, but it’s a picture of a picture and isn’t that close-up, so there wasn’t much I could do.

    It’s weird because I was active in the womb and cried all day as a baby, but as soon as I became a toddler I turned mute. 😐

  3. Happy birthday!

    I loved the way you wrote this post.

    There she studied molecular biology, with several other courses in literature and cultural studies.

    This is one of the things I love about American education. You can take both natural science and social science and/or art courses, or have a quite different major and minor. As someone who is interested in both natural sciences and humanities (specifically, astrophysics and anthropology) this sounds perfect.

  4. In the key of C …
    “Happy birthday to you, happy birthday to you.
    Happy birthday, sweet Alee, happy birthday day to you!”

  5. Mira,

    “This is one of the things I love about American education. You can take both natural science and social science and/or art courses, or have a quite different major and minor.”

    This is what I hate about American education — you have to take courses in areas you’re not interested in. 😛

    Just kidding. It’s good in ways. I took some courses simply because my college had a few distributional requirements, and actually ended up liking them.

    My inorganic chemistry professor was a chemistry and theatre double major, with a minor in political science. It doesn’t get any more diverse than that. Astrophysics and anthro? Definitely doable.

  6. zek,

    “Happy birthday! You should submit this post to Wikipedia for your own Wiki article ; )”

    Thanks. I would do it! If I ever become famous (on a wide scale… :)), I have my whole life story ready.

    ‘In the key of C …
    “Happy birthday to you, happy birthday to you.
    Happy birthday, sweet Alee, happy birthday day to you!” ‘

    Thanks, Sherry. I can hear it now…

    Nkosazana,

    “Halala ngosuku lokuzalwa!”

    Thank you… Does that mean Happy Birthday? I don’t know what language it’s in so I can’t translate it. 🙂

  7. isiZulu and yes its Happy Birthday 😉

    Oh and here it is in Swedish

    Ha den äran! or Grattis på födelsedagen!.

    Tbh I think you can use both, not entirely sure now. Now to ask hubby when he come home. Eish, sometimes my Swedish just locks up on me lol.

  8. Thanks, Robynne.

    “Interesting biography”

    It’s even more interesting in real life (not always in a good way…). 😉

  9. Alee,

    This is what I hate about American education — you have to take courses in areas you’re not interested in

    Lol, I was thinking the same thing. Even though that class I took on fossil fuels and the environment ended up being pretty interesting, I could have done without it. (That, and Common Human Diseases, which scarred me for a little bit.)

  10. Jasmin,

    I disliked the history-ish/social sciences courses the most because you had to do a lot of reading and writing on subjects you might not be passionate about. I enjoyed my African studies courses but even they became a drag after the 50th page of each (dense, prosaic) reading assignment.

  11. Hey Angelyca.

    Thanks muchly. 😀

    P.S. More of my life will be shared in the future — stay tuned!

  12. HAPPY BELATED, Aleeeeeeeee!. So sorry I missed the party, but was, well, busy, kinda, sorta!

    Zum Geburtstag viel Glück
    Zum Geburtstag viel Glück
    Zum Geburtstag liebe Alee
    Zum Geburtstag viel Glück!

  13. Thank you my dear, foosrock.

    You always [nearly] miss every party. Perhaps you should subscribe (see lefthand sidebar, last two options) so you don’t have an excuse anymore.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s